04-07-2014 11:44 PM
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  1. neo158's Avatar
    I've never even heard of this. What all do they have access to?
    Absolutely everything, that's why Carrier IQ was and still is a very controversial piece of software malware. One of the many reasons why I won't touch a Motorola device with a barge pole.
    04-03-2014 07:53 PM
  2. Morpheus Phreak's Avatar
    Absolutely everything, that's why Carrier IQ was and still is a very controversial piece of software. One of the many reasons why I won't touch a Motorola device with a barge pole.
    I gave up on them when I had a special edition R2D2 model that had the startup sounds hardcoded at a specific volume...because the phone would restart a few time a day sometimes in meetings.

    Sure it looked cool, but it was next to useless...which was pretty disappointing. :(
    04-03-2014 07:56 PM
  3. Blake Quartly's Avatar
    Cortana reminds me of some scary cyborg from a sci-fi show. It learns what you do, where you go, who you are, who and what you know, something that no piece of technology should ever know about you (No, I do not use Facebook).

    I'm going to get my WP 8.1, turn off the location services,turn off all of the Cortana tracking features (Hopefully this can be done), and enjoy 8.1. I hate to disable the best feature WP 8.1 has, but I value my privacy over a nice-looking app that talks.

    The last thing I want MS to do is send my location data, people I know, etc to the government...
    .
    Wait what... All of that information is already on your phone already... If they wanted to seek that information they already could. Perhaps you should just throw out your phone altogether if this is how you feel about privacy? There's nothing in Cortana that compromises your privacy anymore than actually owning a smartphone.
    04-03-2014 08:01 PM
  4. thatotherdude24's Avatar
    I gave up on them when I had a special edition R2D2 model that had the startup sounds hardcoded at a specific volume...because the phone would restart a few time a day sometimes in meetings.

    Sure it looked cool, but it was next to useless...which was pretty disappointing. :(
    Absolutely everything, that's why Carrier IQ was and still is a very controversial piece of [S]software[/S] malware. One of the many reasons why I won't touch a Motorola device with a barge pole.
    Somebody fill me in. I've really never heard of it.

    What does it do?
    Is it on all android phones?
    Is it on WP's and iOS?

    Sent From My Woven Black and Yellow Moto X
    04-03-2014 08:12 PM
  5. ohgood's Avatar
    Cortana reminds me of some scary cyborg from a sci-fi show. It learns what you do, where you go, who you are, who and what you know, something that no piece of technology should ever know about you (No, I do not use Facebook).

    I'm going to get my WP 8.1, turn off the location services,turn off all of the Cortana tracking features (Hopefully this can be done), and enjoy 8.1. I hate to disable the best feature WP 8.1 has, but I value my privacy over a nice-looking app that talks.

    The last thing I want MS to do is send my location data, people I know, etc to the government...

    By the way, thanks for crashing my profits, MS... (Signature). I guess i'll have to work on a Cortana exploit to make up the loss.
    It's a smart phone, when you turn it on, you're tracked, recorded, and analyzed.
    04-03-2014 08:23 PM
  6. a5cent's Avatar
    You shouldn't worry about Cortana, the moment you turn your cell phone on you are being tracked, connect to the internet on your PC or any device your are be tracked, data mined and your info is being sifted. And even worse being stored by the NSA indefinitely, it used to be stored for 5 years now it is indefinitely. Not only that when you enter many areas with cameras and video you can be found with facial recognition systems, the only way you are not going to be tracked is living in the wilderness, never using any device that connects to a cell tower or the internet.
    I know I'm repeating myself, but I feel I must if the above argument (and all its variants) keeps popping up. Yes, the NSA can track everything. So? Does that mean your neighbours, teachers, insurers, employers and everyone else on the planet has unlimited access to every bit of data you ever sent across a wire? Does that mean there is nothing left to protect? No! Of course not.

    Whatever the reason for the above argument's popularity, I think it is a false one. Yes, government institutions can access whatever they want, but I find that far less concerning than the prospect of private companies seeking new ways to monetize the data they have collected about us through legal means. At least the NSA doesn't have a profit motive.

    Private companies do not have the kind of access the NSA does. Neither do criminals. Even with the NSA around, there are still many reasons to care about security and privacy.

    The OP was likely bummed about the reduced app sales that Cortana is likely to incur, but there is nothing wrong about the OP's desire to want a good smartphone experience and privacy. Everyone is free to value free stuff over privacy, but the OP has the right to his/her own values.

    No, we won't get the government to keep their noses out of our business, but private companies can only legally track, data mine, and analyse us to the extent we are willing to allow it. That we have absolutely no influence is simply wrong, just as is the claim that all companies and platforms respect and treat privacy equally.
    04-03-2014 09:10 PM
  7. DaT Franchise's Avatar
    Carrier IQ in the simplest terms is a key logger, used to track usage of the phone for purposes "of making software better" it was/is the carrier not the oe doing it, Verizon and AT&T the biggest user of it. Search XDA there's long threads on it over there.
    04-03-2014 10:17 PM
  8. neo158's Avatar
    Carrier IQ in the simplest terms is a key logger, used to track usage of the phone for purposes "of making software better" it was/is the carrier not the oe doing it, Verizon and AT&T the biggest user of it. Search XDA there's long threads on it over there.
    Wrong. It's supposed to be diagnostic software, hidden from the user, installed on various Android devices which cannot be removed. It is now classified as a rootkit and a security risk. AFAIK it isn't installed on Windows Phones or iPhones.
    A895 likes this.
    04-03-2014 10:23 PM
  9. DaT Franchise's Avatar
    No your wrong and it can be removed. Search xda developers

    I may not know alot about the ijunk and WP but I know android been rooting and moding sense the OG days and still have quite a few android phones G2 Gpro HTC one and nexus5
    04-03-2014 10:25 PM
  10. neo158's Avatar
    No your wrong and it can be removed. Search xda developers
    I actually looked at various websites including the Carrier IQ website, not only that but it's hidden within apps on the phone so it makes it nigh on impossible to remove without removing system apps. It isn't a key logger, it's classified as a rootkit.
    Last edited by neo158; 04-03-2014 at 10:52 PM.
    04-03-2014 10:29 PM
  11. DaT Franchise's Avatar
    I actually looked at the Carrier IQ website, not only that but it's hidden within apps on the phone so it makes it nigh on impossible to remove without removing system apps.
    yes I know I explained that it used to be just a simple XML and easy to remove now they hide it in system apks and to remove it you need to decompile and recompile the apk or use apks from a gaps package
    04-03-2014 10:32 PM
  12. DaT Franchise's Avatar
    Yea like there gonna tell you its a key logger just like they clame they removed it only for people to poke around in the xmls and find it hidden

    Flashing an aokp aosp rom also will get rid of it.
    04-03-2014 10:34 PM
  13. neo158's Avatar
    Yea like there gonna tell you its a key logger just like they clame they removed it only for people to poke around in the xmls and find it hidden

    Flashing an aokp aosp rom also will get rid of it.
    It's far more than a simple key logger. It can and does monitor everything, and I do mean everything, you do on your device from what webpages you look at to what apps you have installed and running. From what I can gather it's only US devices that are infested with this rootkit.
    04-03-2014 11:00 PM
  14. DaT Franchise's Avatar
    Yes I know exactly what it is and what it does, it also key logs, as well as the ability to control functions of the phone, the mic camera excetra. This has been discussed in depth on xda and how to completely remove it from the infected apks. Most people have no clue what it does, its far more then what IQ web page tells you, after people started to figure out what it did they backpedaled and said they would remove it because it wasn't hard to find out if you had it on your device, the early versions of it you could see it in the system apps, then they hid it in one app, people figured that one out, called them out on it and then they broke it up, I remember my note 2 it was in the SMS, dialer, and alarm apk. Carrier IQ is a huge invasion of privacy because it loggs absolutely everything your phone does.
    04-03-2014 11:12 PM
  15. DaT Franchise's Avatar
    What was strange was not all of the same phones had it, like AT&T some note2 had it some didn't.
    04-03-2014 11:19 PM
  16. unstoppablekem's Avatar
    This isn't Google, so I trust Microsoft with my "privacy". And they won't send it to the NSA. And even if they do, they'll just see someone staring at a screen...
    04-03-2014 11:25 PM
  17. Aakash Agrawal's Avatar
    I don't think we can expect any great advancements in personal assistant space without shelling out our private data. What is necessary is that we should have a kill switch in our hands which gives us the option to delete our personal data. Cortana is one step closer to that and much ahead of anything google.
    04-04-2014 01:24 AM
  18. thatotherdude24's Avatar
    How many of you don't use Google or android because of Carrier IQ?
    04-04-2014 01:44 AM
  19. Guytronic's Avatar
    All I know is Microsoft has come very far.
    04-04-2014 02:08 AM
  20. Narathan's Avatar
    Help me understand what all the fuss is about. Did anyone actually bother to do some research before commenting about this whole Cortana privacy issue?

    A simple Bing search led me to this article.

    "Central to Microsoft’s vision for Cortana is a Notebook feature that will allow Windows Phone users to control exactly what information is shared with the digital assistant. Notebook will allow the Cortana digital assistant to access information such as location data, behaviors, personal information, reminders, and contact information. We’re told it’s designed as a privacy feature to ensure Cortana doesn’t freely access information without a level of user control. While Cortana will learn things about users, it won't store them in the Notebook without asking you, and any information that's stored can be edited or deleted."


    Source: The Verge (and several others covered this)

    So I hope that takes away some of the confusion. And let's be honest, if somebody wanted to pick me up at their place but they wouldn't give me their adress, how would they expect me to be able to pick them up in the first place? Same goes for Cortana, Siri and Google Now - can't utilize them fully without sharing your personal information... Takes some to get some I guess :)
    04-04-2014 03:22 AM
  21. neo158's Avatar
    What was strange was not all of the same phones had it, like AT&T some note2 had it some didn't.
    That's odd, maybe AT&T stopped using it after all the backlash about it.
    04-04-2014 07:40 AM
  22. neo158's Avatar
    Yes I know exactly what it is and what it does, it also key logs, as well as the ability to control functions of the phone, the mic camera excetra. This has been discussed in depth on xda and how to completely remove it from the infected apks. Most people have no clue what it does, its far more then what IQ web page tells you, after people started to figure out what it did they backpedaled and said they would remove it because it wasn't hard to find out if you had it on your device, the early versions of it you could see it in the system apps, then they hid it in one app, people figured that one out, called them out on it and then they broke it up, I remember my note 2 it was in the SMS, dialer, and alarm apk. Carrier IQ is a huge invasion of privacy because it loggs absolutely everything your phone does.
    That's exactly it, but because the discovery and removal process is so complicated the average user wouldn't even know it's there let alone how to remove it.
    04-04-2014 07:42 AM
  23. JerseySal's Avatar
    This rain today just sucks. Anyone else having an ugly Friday?


    Microsoft handed the NSA access to encrypted messages• Secret files show scale of Silicon Valley co-operation on Prism
    • Outlook.com encryption unlocked even before official launch
    • Skype worked to enable Prism collection of video calls
    • Company says it is legally compelled to complyShare Tweet this

    inShare.691Email Glenn Greenwald, Ewen MacAskill, Laura Poitras, Spencer Ackerman and Dominic Rushe
    The Guardian, Thursday 11 July 2013 Jump to comments (4174)
    Skype worked with intelligence agencies last year to allow Prism to collect video and audio conversations. Photograph: Patrick Sinkel/AP
    Microsoft has collaborated closely with US intelligence services to allow users' communications to be intercepted, including helping the National Security Agency to circumvent the company's own encryption, according to top-secret documents obtained by the Guardian.

    The files provided by Edward Snowden illustrate the scale of co-operation between Silicon Valley and the intelligence agencies over the last three years. They also shed new light on the workings of the top-secret Prism program, which was disclosed by the Guardian and the Washington Post last month.

    The documents show that:

    • Microsoft helped the NSA to circumvent its encryption to address concerns that the agency would be unable to intercept web chats on the new Outlook.com portal;

    • The agency already had pre-encryption stage access to email on Outlook.com, including Hotmail;

    • The company worked with the FBI this year to allow the NSA easier access via Prism to its cloud storage service SkyDrive, which now has more than 250 million users worldwide;

    • Microsoft also worked with the FBI's Data Intercept Unit to "understand" potential issues with a feature in Outlook.com that allows users to create email aliases;

    • In July last year, nine months after Microsoft bought Skype, the NSA boasted that a new capability had tripled the amount of Skype video calls being collected through Prism;

    • Material collected through Prism is routinely shared with the FBI and CIA, with one NSA document describing the program as a "team sport".

    The latest NSA revelations further expose the tensions between Silicon Valley and the Obama administration. All the major tech firms are lobbying the government to allow them to disclose more fully the extent and nature of their co-operation with the NSA to meet their customers' privacy concerns. Privately, tech executives are at pains to distance themselves from claims of collaboration and teamwork given by the NSA documents, and insist the process is driven by legal compulsion.

    In a statement, Microsoft said: "When we upgrade or update products we aren't absolved from the need to comply with existing or future lawful demands." The company reiterated its argument that it provides customer data "only in response to government demands and we only ever comply with orders for requests about specific accounts or identifiers".

    In June, the Guardian revealed that the NSA claimed to have "direct access" through the Prism program to the systems of many major internet companies, including Microsoft, Skype, Apple, Google, Facebook and Yahoo.

    Blanket orders from the secret surveillance court allow these communications to be collected without an individual warrant if the NSA operative has a 51% belief that the target is not a US citizen and is not on US soil at the time. Targeting US citizens does require an individual warrant, but the NSA is able to collect Americans' communications without a warrant if the target is a foreign national located overseas.

    Since Prism's existence became public, Microsoft and the other companies listed on the NSA documents as providers have denied all knowledge of the program and insisted that the intelligence agencies do not have back doors into their systems.

    Microsoft's latest marketing campaign, launched in April, emphasizes its commitment to privacy with the slogan: "Your privacy is our priority."

    Similarly, Skype's privacy policy states: "Skype is committed to respecting your privacy and the confidentiality of your personal data, traffic data and communications content."

    But internal NSA newsletters, marked top secret, suggest the co-operation between the intelligence community and the companies is deep and ongoing.

    The latest documents come from the NSA's Special Source Operations (SSO) division, described by Snowden as the "crown jewel" of the agency. It is responsible for all programs aimed at US communications systems through corporate partnerships such as Prism.

    The files show that the NSA became concerned about the interception of encrypted chats on Microsoft's Outlook.com portal from the moment the company began testing the service in July last year.

    Within five months, the documents explain, Microsoft and the FBI had come up with a solution that allowed the NSA to circumvent encryption on Outlook.com chats

    A newsletter entry dated 26 December 2012 states: "MS [Microsoft], working with the FBI, developed a surveillance capability to deal" with the issue. "These solutions were successfully tested and went live 12 Dec 2012."

    Two months later, in February this year, Microsoft officially launched the Outlook.com portal.

    Another newsletter entry stated that NSA already had pre-encryption access to Outlook email. "For Prism collection against Hotmail, Live, and Outlook.com emails will be unaffected because Prism collects this data prior to encryption."

    Microsoft's co-operation was not limited to Outlook.com. An entry dated 8 April 2013 describes how the company worked "for many months" with the FBI – which acts as the liaison between the intelligence agencies and Silicon Valley on Prism – to allow Prism access without separate authorization to its cloud storage service SkyDrive.

    The document describes how this access "means that analysts will no longer have to make a special request to SSO for this – a process step that many analysts may not have known about".

    The NSA explained that "this new capability will result in a much more complete and timely collection response". It continued: "This success is the result of the FBI working for many months with Microsoft to get this tasking and collection solution established."

    A separate entry identified another area for collaboration. "The FBI Data Intercept Technology Unit (DITU) team is working with Microsoft to understand an additional feature in Outlook.com which allows users to create email aliases, which may affect our tasking processes."

    The NSA has devoted substantial efforts in the last two years to work with Microsoft to ensure increased access to Skype, which has an estimated 663 million global users.

    One document boasts that Prism monitoring of Skype video production has roughly tripled since a new capability was added on 14 July 2012. "The audio portions of these sessions have been processed correctly all along, but without the accompanying video. Now, analysts will have the complete 'picture'," it says.

    Eight months before being bought by Microsoft, Skype joined the Prism program in February 2011.

    According to the NSA documents, work had begun on smoothly integrating Skype into Prism in November 2010, but it was not until 4 February 2011 that the company was served with a directive to comply signed by the attorney general.

    The NSA was able to start tasking Skype communications the following day, and collection began on 6 February. "Feedback indicated that a collected Skype call was very clear and the metadata looked complete," the document stated, praising the co-operation between NSA teams and the FBI. "Collaborative teamwork was the key to the successful addition of another provider to the Prism system."

    ACLU technology expert Chris Soghoian said the revelations would surprise many Skype users. "In the past, Skype made affirmative promises to users about their inability to perform wiretaps," he said. "It's hard to square Microsoft's secret collaboration with the NSA with its high-profile efforts to compete on privacy with Google."

    The information the NSA collects from Prism is routinely shared with both the FBI and CIA. A 3 August 2012 newsletter describes how the NSA has recently expanded sharing with the other two agencies.

    The NSA, the entry reveals, has even automated the sharing of aspects of Prism, using software that "enables our partners to see which selectors [search terms] the National Security Agency has tasked to Prism".

    The document continues: "The FBI and CIA then can request a copy of Prism collection of any selector…" As a result, the author notes: "these two activities underscore the point that Prism is a team sport!"

    In its statement to the Guardian, Microsoft said:

    We have clear principles which guide the response across our entire company to government demands for customer information for both law enforcement and national security issues. First, we take our commitments to our customers and to compliance with applicable law very seriously, so we provide customer data only in response to legal processes.

    Second, our compliance team examines all demands very closely, and we reject them if we believe they aren't valid. Third, we only ever comply with orders about specific accounts or identifiers, and we would not respond to the kind of blanket orders discussed in the press over the past few weeks, as the volumes documented in our most recent disclosure clearly illustrate.

    Finally when we upgrade or update products legal obligations may in some circumstances require that we maintain the ability to provide information in response to a law enforcement or national security request. There are aspects of this debate that we wish we were able to discuss more freely. That's why we've argued for additional transparency that would help everyone understand and debate these important issues.

    In a joint statement, Shawn Turner, spokesman for the director of National Intelligence, and Judith Emmel, spokeswoman for the NSA, said:

    The articles describe court-ordered surveillance – and a US company's efforts to comply with these legally mandated requirements. The US operates its programs under a strict oversight regime, with careful monitoring by the courts, Congress and the Director of National Intelligence. Not all countries have equivalent oversight requirements to protect civil liberties and privacy.

    They added: "In practice, US companies put energy, focus and commitment into consistently protecting the privacy of their customers around the world, while meeting their obligations under the laws of the US and other countries in which they operate."

    It's old news

    http://www.theguardian.com/world/201...tion-user-data
    04-04-2014 07:59 AM
  24. psychotron's Avatar
    Cortana reminds me of some scary cyborg from a sci-fi show. It learns what you do, where you go, who you are, who and what you know, something that no piece of technology should ever know about you (No, I do not use Facebook).

    I'm going to get my WP 8.1, turn off the location services,turn off all of the Cortana tracking features (Hopefully this can be done), and enjoy 8.1. I hate to disable the best feature WP 8.1 has, but I value my privacy over a nice-looking app that talks.

    The last thing I want MS to do is send my location data, people I know, etc to the government...

    By the way, thanks for crashing my profits, MS... (Signature). I guess i'll have to work on a Cortana exploit to make up the loss.
    Ever hear of FISA courts? Microsoft and every other tech company out there is sharing your info with the government. If you think there's another company who would (even be capable of) completely protecting your privacy you are extremely nave, my friend.
    04-04-2014 08:17 AM
  25. Garrymp's Avatar
    Cortana reminds me of some scary cyborg from a sci-fi show. It learns what you do, where you go, who you are, who and what you know, something that no piece of technology should ever know about you (No, I do not use Facebook).

    I'm going to get my WP 8.1, turn off the location services,turn off all of the Cortana tracking features (Hopefully this can be done), and enjoy 8.1. I hate to disable the best feature WP 8.1 has, but I value my privacy over a nice-looking app that talks.

    The last thing I want MS to do is send my location data, people I know, etc to the government...

    By the way, thanks for crashing my profits, MS... (Signature). I guess i'll have to work on a Cortana exploit to make up the loss.
    You can run but you can't hide. You are already captive you have just not yet realized it. The world has been pulled over your eyes....lol....I can keep going.... Hell man, I've seen them building arrow shooting archery robots. The next step is obvious. We are screwed. They will track you and then shoot you...with arrows.
    04-04-2014 10:20 AM
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