Any Photogs Around?

ParoleGA

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So, I have never been really into photography, more just a general tech enthusiast. Since purchasing the Lumia 1020, I have really been enjoying finding things to photograph.

I really like doing things with my phone, instead of on my phone. All my previous smart phones have been used strictly as consumer devices.

So, the point of the thread. I am looking for recommendations for an entry/mid tier dSLR. Currently leaning toward the Nikon D5200, but would love to hear your thoughts on it, and any other models you may think I should consider. $800-1,200 is probably the range I am looking at, for a ready to shoot set up. So, it would need to be near the lower end for a body only model.

Looking forward to reading your feedback. Thanks!
 

wtupyo

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I love my Sony A65 - I have a 90mb read/write card for it I got on Amazon (hurray for lightning deals) and use it mostly for car events (autocross, road racing) and taking pictures of my cats and fish.

Having picked up the 1020 though, I have a feeling my Sony is going to collect some dust until I need to use it at races when needing a longer lens reach.
 

ParoleGA

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I love my Sony A65 - I have a 90mb read/write card for it I got on Amazon (hurray for lightning deals) and use it mostly for car events (autocross, road racing) and taking pictures of my cats and fish.

Having picked up the 1020 though, I have a feeling my Sony is going to collect some dust until I need to use it at races when needing a longer lens reach.

Thanks. I haven't looked at any Sony cameras. I will check em out.

Reach is the 1020s Achilles heel, for sure. Had a few deer in the woods behind my house yesterday. Way to skittish to let me get close enough. I tried, but no focus or resolution. :smile:
 

azcruz

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What will you be shooting mostly?

Having said that, your package is a good start. Same thing I gave my son.
 

Pete

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Yep, the package looks good to me too. Expect to be on a learning curve, you won't get fantastic photos right away, and you'll get some frustration when the results may not meet your expectation.

Grab a couple of books - "Understanding Exposure" and "How to See Creatively", both by Bryan Peterson. These will walk you through the mechanics of photography (what settings to use in what situation to give a certain effect), and also what kinds of compositions makes for good photos. Read them both thoroughly.
 

ParoleGA

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What will you be shooting mostly?

Having said that, your package is a good start. Same thing I gave my son.

I seem to tend towards nature photos, more so than, say, cityscapes. I would think animals and natural landscapes.

Thanks for the feedback!
 

ParoleGA

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Yep, the package looks good to me too. Expect to be on a learning curve, you won't get fantastic photos right away, and you'll get some frustration when the results may not meet your expectation.

Grab a couple of books - "Understanding Exposure" and "How to See Creatively", both by Bryan Peterson. These will walk you through the mechanics of photography (what settings to use in what situation to give a certain effect), and also what kinds of compositions makes for good photos. Read them both thoroughly.

Yeah, all of the settings and abilities are a little overwhelming. Amazon sells Nikon D5200 for Dummies, for a few bucks. Planned to pick it up as well, to start reading up. I will check out Bryan Peterson's books, too. Thanks!
 

azcruz

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Don't let the features overwhelm you. If you get solid understanding of the concepts, exposure, shutter, aperture, white balance, and ISO, it won't matter what camera you use.

Good luck and looking forward to your first shot.

Sent from my Windows Phone 8S by HTC using Tapatalk
 
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Here is my advice. Buy used. Hit up Adorama or B&H and find a previous generation DSLR and get a 50 focal length equivalent lens. On crop sensors, that us about a 35. The Nikon 35/1.8 is so cheap, you have to get it. Primes will teach you more about photography than anything else. Read up on composition and exposure so you understand the impact of each element on an image. It is ok to shoot in auto as long as you take the time to understand what decisions the camera is making for your so you can reverse engineer the settings. I'm spent.
 

ParoleGA

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Here is my advice. Buy used. Hit up Adorama or B&H and find a previous generation DSLR and get a 50 focal length equivalent lens. On crop sensors, that us about a 35. The Nikon 35/1.8 is so cheap, you have to get it. Primes will teach you more about photography than anything else. Read up on composition and exposure so you understand the impact of each element on an image. It is ok to shoot in auto as long as you take the time to understand what decisions the camera is making for your so you can reverse engineer the settings. I'm spent.

I gotta be honest, some of what you said was Greek to me. I get the point though; I can get good experience and learn a lot, with less of an investment. Thanks!
 
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I gotta be honest, some of what you said was Greek to me. I get the point though; I can get good experience and learn a lot, with less of an investment. Thanks!

Part of all this photography stuff is learning the language. It isn't the camera that takes the photograph, it is the photographer. A big part of getting better is understanding exposure and composition and that applies to the 1020 or a medium format monster all the same. I have told several friends to get a D40 and the 35/1.8 and learn. That camera is still one of the best ever made; compact, 6 million really good pixels and quite tough. Take a look at Ian Bramham's work with the D40. Flickriver: Ian Bramham's photos tagged with d40
 

ParoleGA

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Part of all this photography stuff is learning the language. It isn't the camera that takes the photograph, it is the photographer. A big part of getting better is understanding exposure and composition and that applies to the 1020 or a medium format monster all the same. I have told several friends to get a D40 and the 35/1.8 and learn. That camera is still one of the best ever made; compact, 6 million really good pixels and quite tough. Take a look at Ian Bramham's work with the D40. Flickriver: Ian Bramham's photos tagged with d40

Those photos are gorgeous, and really show how a photo can affect feeling, not just capture an image. I am more focused on learning the technicalities of the hardware right now. Scene composition is equally, if not more important. For now, just understanding the language and details on the hardware are a bit overwhelming. Composition, lighting, etc., will come later, I hope. I am a bit more left brain, than right, so have never been very artistic. I'll be a hobbyist at best, no aspirations at being a pro photographer.

The D40 does look interesting. No longer available at BH, but Adorama does have an E+ rated used kit, with two lenses, for $449. I would get the 35/1.8 separately. You seem to know your stuff. I assume that is a fair price?

Also, any thoughts on the D40x? They have one for 40 bucks less, without the 50-200mm lens. I know lenses aren't cheap, but not sure how much I'll need that much zoom, and might prefer the MP bump.

Thanks
 

dalydose

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Your kit looks fine, although I'm a Canon shooter. Read up a little bit, but the best tool for learning is to just go out and shoot. Take some shots on Auto and then start fiddling with manual control.
 
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Many see the D40 as a better camera. E+ means damn near new. Consider getting the D40 only for $169, the 38/1.8 and maybe the 18-105 zoom they list for $209. Those kitted lenses do not feature VR, very handy for learning, makes a lens a little more forgiving. So yeah, stills only, one all-purpose zoom, one prime. Maybe consider a flash once you get going...
 
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Oh, and I am not trying to push you to Nikon. By all means, try both Canon and Nikon, even Sony at a Best Buy to see which you like best as far as controls. You are going to grow into the big boys, you want to like how that line of camera feels in your hands, more important than specs because you won;t use a camera you hate using.
 

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