Could next Windows 10 Phones be used as a full PC?

Balsa Lazarevic

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Since Microsoft announced that Windows 10 OS will also be the next Windows Phone OS, just scaled down to smaller size, will I be able to connect Bluetooth keyboard and mouse to my phone, and then connect it to my TV or monitor (via HDMI or preferable Miracast) and use it as every other Desktop PC?
 

a5cent

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No.

Windows 10 Mobile will lack the desktop and not be able to run any of the software normally associated with Windows (desktop applications). However, with Windows 10, all Windows devices will be able to run the exact same metro apps (a.k.a. Windows Store apps). Being "able to run" the same metro apps doesn't necessarily mean "will run" however. Some apps may still require too much screen real-estate to make sense on a small device like a smartphone. That will be up to developers to decide.
 

Aresjr21

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The best way I can summarize Windows 10 for mobile would be kind of like the days of Windows Mobile. Although the "desktop" might look similar, it is not a traditional CPU desktop to run legacy programs. Think more along the lines of RT, minus the desktop option.
 

Squachy

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In terms of software, a5cent would be correct. You wont be able to play something like starcraft on the phone or run something like PhotoShop unless its specifically a phone version. In terms of something like Bluetooth keyboard or tv output? That's more likely. Windows phone already has Miracast support so there's that.
 

Aresjr21

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In terms of software, a5cent would be correct. You wont be able to play something like starcraft on the phone or run something like PhotoShop unless its specifically a phone version. In terms of something like Bluetooth keyboard or tv output? That's more likely. Windows phone already has Miracast support so there's that.
But does current devices, through the use of Miracast, project a desktop when shown on a larger screen?
 

a5cent

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But does current devices, through the use of Miracast, project a desktop when shown on a larger screen?

No. It just projects whatever you see on your display, which is never a desktop.
W10 devices won't project a desktop either. The features/functionality required to support the desktop simply won't exist on W10 mobile devices. Not being able to project a desktop has nothing to do with with screen size or keyboard availability. It's a result of the Windows desktop component not being a part of the W10 mobile package.
What I would like to see are apps that reconfigure their UI to the tablett version, when being displayed on a larger screen. That is something we likely will see.
 

shoaib rahman

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Smart phones have differnet hardware and OS. So there is no question arise that it works inplace of PC. we can't run PC sofware in WP.
Unless that specific app is built for WP OS.
 

EMINENT 1

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I was just thinking this today...

What if we could have a phone running an Atom. Have a desktop app that when opened could project your phone's desktop app to a full screen on a Surface or Xbox?

Yeah, not going to happen because of security, but it'd be nice.
 

a5cent

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I was just thinking this today...

What if we could have a phone running an Atom. Have a desktop app that when opened could project your phone's desktop app to a full screen on a Surface or Xbox?

Yeah, not going to happen because of security, but it'd be nice.

It's not just about security. It's also not just about CPU architectures. Most people assume the ARM vs x86 issue is the biggest problem, when that's not even half of it.

Far more important is the fact that none of the desktop software developed for Windows, nor even the Windows OS itself, is suited to running on ultra mobile (resource restricted) devices like smartphones. There are a whole host of problems this causes, most of which are basically unsolvable. It's was obvious that Win32 could not retain compatibility with existing software, while also providing a runtime environment that is well suited to low-power devices. That was basically the starting point for developing WinRT (API and runtime).

I'm sure we'll soon have the technology to carry around a desktop OS in our pocket, but the bigger question is if we'll ever want to, considering how much better such devices are when being restricted to running only low-power optimized OSes and apps.
 

someone2639

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It's not just about security. It's also not just about CPU architectures. Most people assume the ARM vs x86 issue is the biggest problem, when that's not even half of it.

Far more important is the fact that none of the desktop software developed for Windows, nor even the Windows OS itself, is suited to running on ultra mobile (resource restricted) devices like smartphones. There are a whole host of problems this causes, most of which are basically unsolvable. It's was obvious that Win32 could not retain compatibility with existing software, while also providing a runtime environment that is well suited to low-power devices. That was basically the starting point for developing WinRT (API and runtime).

I'm sure we'll soon have the technology to carry around a desktop OS in our pocket, but the bigger question is if we'll ever want to, considering how much better such devices are when being restricted to running only low-power optimized OSes and apps.

Desktop OS in our pocket?

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ultra-Mobile_PC

You're welcome.
 

rhapdog

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I think in less than 10 years the hardware will be to the point that we will have what would be considered a high end desktop of this year in our pocket.

Windows 10 provides a starting point on some features that could take advantage of it, if Microsoft sees this coming, and they would be fooling not to predict this coming.

What I have been envisioning for some time now is technology coming to a point to have x86_64 system on a chip that will be able to run the full version of Windows, with desktop and all. Normally, desktop mode would be disabled unless plugged into external keyboard/mouse/monitor in a docked mode. Take your phone to work, dock it, and use a large 27" display with keyboard and mouse to do your work. The phone and computer will eventually merge.

Think about how cool it would be when that day arrives to be able to carry your computer in your pocket instead of a flash drive that contains your files? Let's face it, when I got my first laptop, the IBM Convertable, it was a monster to carry around with the battery at 27 pounds of weight. It had an 8088 CPU running at 4.7MHz, and 512KB RAM. Not the 512MB I have in my L520. There was no hard drive storage. It had dual 3.5" floppy disks that could hold 1.44MB each, with the OS on one disk and your current application on the other disk. If you wanted to run a hundred apps, you carried nearly 100 3.5" floppy disks.

Yeah, my low-end Lumia 520 rocks. I've got more than 4 colors on it, and it can play more than 3 polyphonic tones at once. Anyone remember CGA graphics? It was high-end stuff when it came out. Now people laugh at 320x200 resolution that has only 4 colors.

Sorry, I'm ranting and getting off-topic.
 

spaulagain

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Lol, you guys are answering the wrong question. The OP said nothing of legacy apps. Simply whether or not you could connect a mouse, keyboard, and monitor and use it like a Desktop.

From a technology standpoint, there would be no reason you can't. And if MS follows through with what they hinted at, the apps and OS UI should adapt to the larger screen and mouse/keyboard. I think MS could make a massive wave in the smartphone market if they made this possible. Especially when you consider many people in third world country don't have computers outside a phone.
 

a5cent

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Lol, you guys are answering the wrong question. The OP said nothing of legacy apps. Simply whether or not you could connect a mouse, keyboard, and monitor and use it like a Desktop.

From a technology standpoint, there would be no reason you can't. And if MS follows through with what they hinted at, the apps and OS UI should adapt to the larger screen and mouse/keyboard. I think MS could make a massive wave in the smartphone market if they made this possible. Especially when you consider many people in third world country don't have computers outside a phone.

While possible, I doubt that is true. Only the OP can tell us what was really meant, but the question did end with "and use it as every other Desktop PC". I'd wager that 99% of the time, that's asking about the ability to run desktop software (which you call legacy apps) on the phone.
 

spaulagain

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While possible, I doubt that is true. Only the OP can tell us what was really meant, but the question did end with "and use it as every other Desktop PC". I'd wager that 99% of the time, that's asking about the ability to run desktop software (which you call legacy apps) on the phone.

I think that's a really big assumption. You're basically assuming that a Windows Central user that's been on here for over 6 months doesn't have the slightest clue about the difference between x86 and ARM Windows.

Also, using it like a desktop means exactly that. Using a keyboard/mouse, and monitor. The OP even explicitly noted keyboard, mouse, and Miracast TV, etc. Which is even further evidence that's exactly what they were asking about.

It's fine to mention x86 apps won't work. But 99% of this thread is discussing that and completely ignoring what the OP was actually asking about. Hence my attempt to get back on that subject.

Oh ya, not to mention that one could use an ARM tablet (i.e. Surface) like a desktop currently. So that would make sense to extend the functionally, not kill it.
 

anon9169769

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I think that's a really big assumption. You're basically assuming that a Windows Central user that's been on here for over 6 months doesn't have the slightest clue about the difference between x86 and ARM Window.


Personally I don't know what the difference is and I have been a window phone user for 2 years
 

spaulagain

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Personally I don't know what the difference is and I have been a window phone user for 2 years

Should probably research that then. In short, they are different processor technologies. Traditional x86 apps (old desktop apps like AutoCAD) can't run on ARM because of the different processor architecture. But applications can be recompiled to run on ARM.
 

a5cent

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I think that's a really big assumption.
The way the question was asked, is exactly how I'd expect most to enquire about running desktop software on their phone, whether they understand what's behind x86/ARM incompatibilities or not. I think almost nobody who says "desktop software" is thinking about using the keyboard/mouse with Windows Store apps, but certainly, I could be wrong. I guess we'll have to wait for the OP to chime in.

Even then though, the x86/ARM issue isn't the main reason why we won't be able to run desktop software on W10 mobile. The far more important issue is that W10 mobile will (thankfully) omit all of its larger brothers' Win32 baggage. As a result, W10 mobile won't run such software even if it is provided with desktop software that is compiled for ARM.
 

anon(5327127)

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Yes.

​COnnect your phone to a screen, keyboard and mouse, then remote into a full computer. It can be 'used' as a full pc but I'm twisting the words.
 

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