How to find the IP Address of your WAP

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Windows Central Question

How does one find the WAP's IP Address (without Fing, Wire Shark, etc.)

Example: When I am on my home network, if I type in "ipconfig /all" in to CMD, and type the IP address of the default gateway in to my web browser, I can login to my ISP's router/ WAP. However, in the work environment, this brings you to the firewall. If you type "ARP -A" you get the IP Address and MAC Address. I know the MAC Address to each WAP, but it isn't coming up on the list of items when I enter ARP -A.

Is it possible to using CMD and enter the ARP command with the MAC Address of the known WAP to get the IP Address?
 

Noob Cydroid

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At CMD, start with:
netsh wlan show interface

Look for the MAC listed as the BSSID.

Then run the command:
arp -a
Find the BSSID's MAC and that should give you the IP of the WAP.

Just curious, any reason you're trying to get the IP of the WAP? It kind of sounds like you have some level of access to the network's equipment. If so, you can get that info from the firewall, gateway, switch, etc. as well.
 

ashuppen

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T Moore, that won’t help in this situation.

Noob Cydroid, thanks for the reply. You are the first person to actually help. On another forum, I was told they wouldn’t help me hack. I am an entry level IT tech and I am always trying to learn new things. Very often, there is more than one way to skin a cat. I prefer using CMD when I can.

The command gave me the description, GUID, Physical Address, State, SSID, BSSID, etc. Unfortunately, the IP address was not listed. I will try logging in to the firewall, switch, etc. Thanks again, I assumed that since you can find so many IP Addresses using the ARP command without entering the MAC address, that if you knew the specific MAC address there would be an option to get the information for that specific item entered.
 

Ryujingt3

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At CMD, start with:
netsh wlan show interface

Look for the MAC listed as the BSSID.

Then run the command:
arp -a
Find the BSSID's MAC and that should give you the IP of the WAP.

Just curious, any reason you're trying to get the IP of the WAP? It kind of sounds like you have some level of access to the network's equipment. If so, you can get that info from the firewall, gateway, switch, etc. as well.

Beaten to it. But why are you wanting to do this?
 

ashuppen

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Sorry, I should have noted this earlier too, although the BSSID is listed, when I cross referenced it with the ARP-a command, I didn't see the information listed. I logged in to the Firewall, I am seeing all the other equipment. Thanks for the help though. I will keep researching and try logging in to the other equipment. Again, this is not for nefarious reasons, I learn best by being hands on. Theories or reading textbooks, works, but the hands-on process of actually doing something ingrains the process in my memory.
 

ashuppen

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To clarify, I am the one who asked the original question. I was able to post the question without an account. However, when I went to reply to the questions, I could not reply. Consequently, I created an account to reply to the questions.
 

Noob Cydroid

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Hands on learning makes things stick best.

Sorry those commands didn't get you the IP. Hope you can get it from the network side.

If the network has a difficult layout, poorly managed records, or no controllers, you may have to connect a test device to the WAP and ping, look at arp/mac address tables, telnet and hop from switch to switch till you find your test device.
 

Noob Cydroid

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You know, I never gave AngryIP a good try. I don't think I have the patience to ever use it :p

If OP has access to log in to switches etc, I think it's a safe bet he'll find the MAC from that end or he'll have access to docs on the network that'll probably have that info listed somewhere.
 

Ryujingt3

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You know, I never gave AngryIP a good try. I don't think I have the patience to ever use it :p

If OP has access to log in to switches etc, I think it's a safe bet he'll find the MAC from that end or he'll have access to docs on the network that'll probably have that info listed somewhere.

Hopefully the OP will respond, so we can get more information about whether what you suggested and whether or not it worked.
 

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