Surface is a “failed” attempt to replace paper

anon(7929613)

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Microsoft launched its first Surface device in 2012 and with it, aimed to revolutionise the way we write and draw besides providing us with a powerful computing experience on a smaller form-factor. After 5 long years and numerous updates, it succeeded in the later but failed in other aspects. I say this because I have seen very few people using Surface to write and draw. I myself do not enjoy writing on it because of the lag issues.

There are devices like “DOMO nScribe Scribble Pad” that are not only thinner and lighter, but offers better writing experience than Surface. However, they have limited features and not particularly a game changer.

I think Surface Pro needs further improvements if it wants to dethrone paper.

What do you think? Do you use Surface Pro to write and draw?
 

xandros9

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The Surface was more of an attempt to replace one's laptop, that's what a lot of marketing focused around and the pen functionality was just a nice bonus for digital artists or for notetaking.
 

etphoto

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The surface will never dethrone paper and I never remember reading anything claims it would. The credit card never pushed cash completely out the door nor will the surface push paper.

Twitter: @PhotographyET
 

anon(7929613)

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The surface will never dethrone paper and I never remember reading anything claims it would. The credit card never pushed cash completely out the door nor will the surface push paper.

Twitter: @PhotographyET

But products like Surface Studio and the emphasis on "creators" shows that Microsoft wants to pit it against paper.
 

Najo

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It has replaced my daily journal, to do list, the need to print/ sign/ scan documents, and I no longer print and carry manuals/ procedures. So while it hasn't completely, it has eliminated a pretty good chunk of paper.
 

BajanSaint69

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I wouldn't say failed, I would say more "hasn't been completely successful yet". Seeing AI will now read handwriting, which will probably move it along, as will having a mobile device with a "notebook" design metaphor. It would be amazing to have a device where you didn't need a keyboard but could just write in it.

Windows Ink was one of the foundational parts of this, as is the Seeing AI handwriting recognition. I'd agree they want to replace paper, I wouldn't agree that they've failed. This is clearly an ongoing effort.
 

etphoto

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But products like Surface Studio and the emphasis on "creators" shows that Microsoft wants to pit it against paper.

Microsoft has nothing against paper. I'd say they want to sell products, that is their goal, not to element paper.

Twitter: @PhotographyET
 

TechFreak1

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But products like Surface Studio and the emphasis on "creators" shows that Microsoft wants to pit it against paper.

That's you're projection and opinion, not fact :).

It would be fact if Microsoft had explicitly stated they wanted to push out paper through their Surface tablets.

Personally, we all should be inking digitally as that means less tress are cut down to make paper and that is way better for the environment and safeguards the planet for future generations.
 
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fatclue_98

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If Microsoft wanted to eliminate paper, why did they drop Windows Journal right before the Anniversary Update and all but cripple older Wacom digitizers. They bought N-Trig and took the axe to note taking capabilities. Drawing and notes are worlds apart.
 

xandros9

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But products like Surface Studio and the emphasis on "creators" shows that Microsoft wants to pit it against paper.

Sketches and notes aren’t the only things “creators” create. Surface Studio is getting at the digital art and productivity types - we’re talking Photoshop, maybe some lighter duty 3D modeling, etc.
 

Adventurer64

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What do you think? Do you use Surface Pro to write and draw?

Not so much with my SP3, but daily with my SP5 (2017 or whatever it's called). The only writing experience that's been better is when I tried a friends reMarkable tablet. However, the SP5 writing experience is good enough for me.
 

jasqid

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But products like Surface Studio and the emphasis on "creators" shows that Microsoft wants to pit it against paper.

That not at all what that means. It and Windows 10 is being touted as a tool to create. Content. Art. Documents. Whatever. I'm not seeing how that is meaning to try and kill paper or how anyone could get there.
 

anon(7929613)

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Whatever. I'm not seeing how that is meaning to try and kill paper or how anyone could get there.


SurfacePen.JPG

SurfacePen2.JPG

This is from Microsoft's official website for Surface Pen. It says, "Buy Surface Pen - Write and Draw naturally | Surface - Microsoft", and "Writes like a pen on paper".

Well it doesn't. Hence, I cannot use it in place of paper. That's all I wanted to highlight.
 
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Rowdy Bedsaul

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Microsoft launched its first Surface device in 2012 and with it, aimed to revolutionise the way we write and draw besides providing us with a powerful computing experience on a smaller form-factor. After 5 long years and numerous updates, it succeeded in the later but failed in other aspects. I say this because I have seen very few people using Surface to write and draw. I myself do not enjoy writing on it because of the lag issues.

There are devices like “DOMO nScribe Scribble Pad” that are not only thinner and lighter, but offers better writing experience than Surface. However, they have limited features and not particularly a game changer.

I think Surface Pro needs further improvements if it wants to dethrone paper.

What do you think? Do you use Surface Pro to write and draw?

Go to a college campus and you'll see tons of people using them as paper. especial on an engineering campus. Also all 'artist' that I know have bought a surface or surface clone. Drawing and handwriting on a computer just isn't for everyone.
 

techiez

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View attachment 138406

View attachment 138407

This is from Microsoft's official website for Surface Pen. It says, "Buy Surface Pen - Write and Draw naturally | Surface - Microsoft", and "Writes like a pen on paper".

Well it doesn't. Hence, I cannot use it in place of paper. That's all I wanted to highlight.

all it means is surface pen can be used just as if you are writing on a paper using pen, using natural flow, you dont need to hold the surface pen as to be perpendicular to the screen.

if your point is about lag then its valid, see if its an issue with current settings of your specific machine.

In general I dont think MS is out there to replace paper.
 

jnjroach

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I gave up paper back with the 2nd Gen Tablet PCs in 2003 which were bulking and heavy. I've been using the Surface line since Gen 1 and I use OneNote and ink all of my notes (again - been doing that since 2003).

I only read eBooks mainly on my Surface. I use Drawboard PDF for inking and annotating PDFs (I also use this to sign official documents). I ink in Office 365 for all of the feedback on my team's copy.

I have searchable ink notes dated back 14 years now, I'm even taking up Bullet Journaling for 2018 using OneNote.

I only just installed a printer because I need to print something to post on my cubical wall due to a work request.


For me the Surface has replaced paper...
 

mklwrmrdm

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I use the SP4 i7 as my daily driver, connected to a 40" 4K tv, the ideal setup for my needs at the moment. Ironically the big display is only used for the browser and some videos. All the rest happens on the small Surface display. Altough the pen is not that precise, and the latency on this model, compared to my Intuos pro, is just plain horrible.. but yet it still has become my one and only device to draw/illustrate on. Mainly because of the ability to see the lines (more or less) appear where you draw them instead of drawing on your desk and see the lines appear on a screen in front of you. Can only dream about what will happen in the future, but I very much like this path they've chosen.
 

indexcards_ink

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It's definitely not a failed strategy, but better apps are needed. This was the driving force for me to create my app SPECIFICALLY for windows 10, and specifically at the time for Surface - Index Cards (Index Cards - Home). I love my device, but i knew that a packet of index cards for $2 was more productive than a $2000 machine. This didn't feel right to me! Now I built the app, and i'm happy many people are also using it, and I can tell you i definitely do not use paper any more! Between taking notes on Index Cards, and occasionally storing web clips and data in One Note, i use my surface as a MUCH MORE PRODUCTIVE TOOL THAN PAPER. I can do things on my Index Cards app that you can't do on paper. Also as an aside, I have an iPad Pro with Pen and i can tell you it's not a touch on the Surface Pro. the feel of the Surface Pen is the BEST BAR NONE, and I've played with and experimented with many windows and other devices over the years. And with more advanced devices to come from Microsoft in the future, and with all of us developers continuing to advance the art, I am confident that things will keep getting better - and cooler! :) thanks.

Prem Sundaram. Developer, Index Cards for Windows 10. www.indexcards.ink
 

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